tickled pink

261/365: annabelle hydrangea turning pink

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I guess it’s her little secret as to why, but something has our old-fashioned white hydrangea blushing positively pink…

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every diva has her day

250/365: zinnia

blog091115_Zinnia-in-studio

Zinnias are a beautiful but humble flower. Planted by haphazard handfuls of seed, they spring up cheerfully wherever they’re thrown. It’s never about choreography, just a riot of joyful color.

The spotlight changes everything.

friends in low places

Pretty isn’t it? It’s Creeping Charlie.

Where I come from, this specimen is one of the most vile, despised weeds to ever sully a perfect green lawn. A closer look reveals the plant to be quite lovely. It’s also edible, a common salad green in many countries. Would it help to call it another name? Let’s try ground ivy…

‘Weeds are flowers too once you get to know them.’ – A.A. Milne

blog050515_creepingcharlie123/365: ground ivy (glechoma hederacea)

good company

Yesterday I was invited to my dear friend Sue’s garden to photograph her abundant spread of bloodroot. I’d never photographed (or seen?) them before. They are a delightful and diminutive woodland flower; getting to know them properly required me to spend a fair amount of time lying on the ground. It was the highlight of my day. Good company all around.

 

blog041715_bloodroot105/365: bloodroot (sanguinaria canadensis)

Notes: The plant stores a red, poisonous sap, hence the graphic name. This photo is somewhat deceiving; the central leaf belongs to another plant. I like the sense of intermingling…

ghosts of the garden, pt. 2

Yesterday’s remains looked like old, bleached bones to me. Today’s papery tomatillo husks reminded me more of snake skins, all dried up and left behind in the dirt. But then there’s that intricate lacey map of veins, so like blood vessels, like a record of the life that coursed through this tomatillo ghost town.

blog031715_tomatillo husks74/365: tomatillo husks

native: liatris

It took a closer look to see the tiny individual dried flowers on this liatris stalk. And a photograph to make me see its fruit: tiny seeds adorned with hairy parachute tufts to carry them off on the wind.

blog012515_liatris stalk24/365: liatris fruit & flower