aster-nomical

276/365: white prairie asters

white prairie asters

The asters have won my heart for the sheer exuberant volume of blossoms they produce, for being hearty and beautiful in a kind of workaday way, for blooming so late in the season when the garden is a mess and I’ve lost my gumption for it until next spring. We might all pursue our vocations with such earnest cheer.

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new hue

246/365: purple woods aster

blog090715_purple-woods-aster

Walking through the summer woods is a largely monochromatic experience. Green on green. Any other color really stands out.

I’m happy either way: I never tire of the infinite shades and textures of the leaves but the surprise of a wildflower is always welcome.

growing like a weed

221/365: wild senna

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You can tell the native plants BELONG here because of the way they thrive.

We chose the wild senna for the cool shape of the leaves. We had no idea that it would grow taller than me the first season (I’m 5’3 so it’s not a huge feat, but still).

If you live in the Twin Cities, please let me know if you’d like one of these giants for your own garden. I’ve got babies all over the place and I’m happy to share. Be ready for a soundtrack of contented buzzing – the pollinators are coming in droves.

 

good company

Yesterday I was invited to my dear friend Sue’s garden to photograph her abundant spread of bloodroot. I’d never photographed (or seen?) them before. They are a delightful and diminutive woodland flower; getting to know them properly required me to spend a fair amount of time lying on the ground. It was the highlight of my day. Good company all around.

 

blog041715_bloodroot105/365: bloodroot (sanguinaria canadensis)

Notes: The plant stores a red, poisonous sap, hence the graphic name. This photo is somewhat deceiving; the central leaf belongs to another plant. I like the sense of intermingling…

native: liatris

It took a closer look to see the tiny individual dried flowers on this liatris stalk. And a photograph to make me see its fruit: tiny seeds adorned with hairy parachute tufts to carry them off on the wind.

blog012515_liatris stalk24/365: liatris fruit & flower